what is volatile in c

QuestionsCategory: Anything Programmingwhat is volatile in c
AdminAdmin asked 5 months ago

The proper use of C’s volatile keyword is poorly understood by many programmers. This is not surprising, as most C texts dismiss it in a sentence or two. This article will teach you the proper way to do it.

Have you experienced any of the following in your C or C++ embedded code?

Code that works fine–until you enable compiler optimizations
Code that works fine–until interrupts are enabled
Flaky hardware drivers
RTOS tasks that work fine in isolation–until some other task is spawned
If you answered yes to any of the above, it’s likely that you didn’t use the C keyword volatile. You aren’t alone. The use of volatile is poorly understood by many programmers. Unfortunately, most books about the C programming language dismiss volatile in a sentence or two.

C’s volatile keyword is a qualifier that is applied to a variable when it is declared. It tells the compiler that the value of the variable may change at any time–without any action being taken by the code the compiler finds nearby. The implications of this are quite serious. However, before we examine them, let’s take a look at the syntax.

Syntax of C’s volatile Keyword
To declare a variable volatile, include the keyword volatile before or after the data type in the variable definition. For instance both of these declarations will declare foo to be a volatile integer:

volatile int foo;
int volatile foo;
Now, it turns out that pointers to volatile variables are very common, especially with memory-mapped I/O registers. Both of these declarations declare pReg to be a pointer to a volatile unsigned 8-bit integer:

volatile uint8_t * pReg;
uint8_t volatile * pReg;
Volatile pointers to non-volatile data are very rare (I think I’ve used them once), but I’d better go ahead and give you the syntax:

int * volatile p;
And just for completeness, if you really must have a volatile pointer to a volatile variable, you’d write:

int volatile * volatile p;
Incidentally, for a great explanation of why you have a choice of where to place volatile and why you should place it after the data type (for example, int volatile * foo), read Dan Sak’s column “Top-Level cv-Qualifiers in Function Parameters” (Embedded Systems Programming, February 2000, p. 63).

Finally, if you apply volatile to a struct or union, the entire contents of the struct/union are volatile. If you don’t want this behavior, you can apply the volatile qualifier to the individual members of the struct/union.

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